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English 39
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)
, for the most part, dodging hurricane irene. >> do you expect that this time around? >> no, i don't. at this think we're probably already further along in this storm than we were with irene. the ocean is angry right now. and we're going to see a storm surge. >> reporter: a surge that could raise sea level up to eight feet above normal, enough to flood much of this city. police are urging but not forcing people in the evacuation zone to leave. most here are heeding their advice. the boardwalk is all but abandoned. but some like brian have decided to stay. >> got everything pretty well situated, bunkered down, generator is ready to rock. hang out, ride it out, road out irene last year, wasn't that bad. >> reporter: but the experts say this storm could be much worse than irene. here in maryland and farther up the coast including in new jersey. and that's where elaine quijano is, elaine? >> reporter: well, chip, we're in the town of bayhead, new jersey, which is especially vulnerable it sits just ten feet above sea level and like other coastal communities residents here have been orde
, ladies and gentlemen, i stood in this very spot a year ago for hurricane irene. there were some similar dire warnings then, and when the storm came, it actually leapfrogged over new york city and landed further up the hudson river and caused considerable damage there, although we didn't know it as the storm was happening and one of the things i've learned in 40 years of coverage these events is that it is always worse than it initially seems because you begin to tally the damage once daylight comes and once things get more calm. but this will not be like a traditional hurricane, this will not be something that happens in six or eight hours and then we're on with our lives and this is an enduring event, it is the collision of the three big weather systems, the tropical hurricanes, the frigid winds coming down from the north and that western low pressure system, everything's going to get churned around and it's going to be part of our lives, unfortunately, for several days, and i think, i fear that before this is over, it's going to be a story with many, many tragic ramifications. but sta
with the storm surge. in irene at battery park which is where i am tonight, we had three to six feet. we expect four to eight here and down the jersey shore. that will be higher than what they dealt with during irene. plan on similar scenarios there. look at the rainfall. huge areas of two inches plus, four inches plus. locally ten inches in spots in parts of new jersey and the chesapeake bay. if you remember the state of new jersey was one of those heavily flooded last year with irene. to add insult to injury, west virginia, maryland, pennsylvania and parts of west virginia could get 50 inches of snow with this. add all these ingredients together, that means power outages, some which will last for weeks. pennsylvania, new york, west virginia, an 800-mile-wide damage path with this. on the 108th anniversary of the opening of the subway system in new york we hope in 48 hours, parts of it won't be under water. >> places are holding their breath tonight. jim, thanks. as we co on the air they are beginning to feel the effects on north carolina's outer banks. weather channel meteorologist julie mart
affected by the floodings and power out nl outa irene. >> you know, irene was more of a direct hit in a way because this area saw a lot of flooding, saw a lot of rain from it. in fact, i was speaking with someone here just a few minutes ago about what happened in this area, this highway 12. coastal highway 12. there was a major section of that that washed away from the storm. this morning what we're expecting to see, again, that first band of strong winds, the rain that will be coming through, again, the storm has been downgraded, but officials are saying, you know, do not take the storm for granted. it still will be a strong storm that bring winds and anywhere from 40 to 50 miles per hour i was told. but, you know, at this point, people are paying very close attention, i should say, to what's happening out here in the skies. >> as they should. george howell in the outer banks of north carolina, thank you. >>> meanwhile, you know, millions of people could lose power from this storm and the edison electric institute is warning people that outages could last for seven to ten days. right now t
evacuation order. >> we lucked out with irene, and this may be worse, it's scary. >> reporter: in atlantic city, the last minute rush to board up the gambling mecca, which now looks like a ghost town. along the east coast from delaware to connecticut, hundreds of thousands after people live in mandatory evacuation areas. more than 370,000 alone in new york city. where the entire transit system, trains, busses and subways shut down tonight. further inland in nrnl new jersey some race to open reservoirs and rivers hoping to avoid what's expected to be major flooding. local leaders have been plenty. >> we need you to act puntly. >> reporter: electrical crews plan to work all night and help is on the way, utility workers as for as way . with the weather getting so bad, authorities say the best advise is to just stay at home, that's probably going to be the safest place, a lot of schools and businesses up and down the coast are going to be closeded tomorrow and probably for a few days to come, because the storm as you know is not going anywhere for quite a while. lester? >> ron allen on the new
is that we kind of had those same warnings for irene. i don't want people to go, oh, they just say that all the time just to get our attention. but, no, there is potential for some dire stuff going on here. and we're talking about power down -- power lines down, trees down, all kinds of other things. finally the computers are agreeing. and you can see a couple doing loops. if this thing does a loop right over new york or new jersey or pennsylvania, that means 24 to 36 hours of rain coming down an inch in an hour. do the math. that's a couple feet of potential water. here we go. the potential impacts, i think the coastal infland flooding the biggest. obviously we saw that in vermont from irene. the waves will be larger than 30 feet battering long island, new rhode island all the way to massachusetts and new jersey depending on where it lands. coastal erosion. we could lose homes as the beach gets washed away and power outages could be in the millions taking literally maybe a week to get all those power lines back up. and that could be far enough that it could affect the election. wolf. >> br
hurricane irene, we achieved a 98% evacuation rate. but for whatever reason, this time, we haven't reached that number yet. we think we're somewhere having evacuated several thousand people. but we still have too many people in atlantic city. that creates a very uncomfortable situation for all of our emergency responders and officials are still trying to do the best we can to get people out of harm's way. >> mayor, ali velshi is on the streets of atlantic city. right now, the winds are obviously very gusty. ali, you have a question you'd like to ask the mayor. >> reporter: yes, i do, mayor. and the important thing is by looking at atlantic city, people can look at this and say, this might happen in my community. if you're still not evacuated, what do you do? i know people are driving around. they can get out in their car but it's gusty and dangerous. should people leave and go to a shelter now or hunker down and stay? >> at this point, i think they would be best served to stay at home and hunker down. i just visited a couple of our shelters. i had a very difficult time getting back to wher
." capable of causing more damage than hurricane irene last year. the height of the storm should be tuesday, and it will take its sweet time making an exit. churning in the atmosphere over the same spots for five or even six days. now, depending on where you live, it may bring up to six inches of rain, 80-mile-per-hour wind gusts, 20 to 30-foot high seas and extreme coastal flooding. it's all during a full moon, too, when tides are even higher. it could even bring half a foot of heavy, wet snow as far inland as ohio. >> 60% chance that sandy will hit us. >> reporter: that's why east coast emergency management teams are gearing up and extra help is being brought in from other states. emergency officials up and down the east coast are warning people that you can't wait. you have to get your emergency kits and emergency plans in place now. diane? >> ginger, thank you so much. now abc's weather editor sam champion is here. show us these giant forces of nature about to collide, sam. >> reporter: superstorm, monster storm. this one has three ingredients, diane, so, let's run through them. first o
to be evacuations like we saw with irene. we have evacuations for fire island, though. a low-lying barrier island on the south shore of long island. and you know, you can't take this seriously enough. storm surge is very dangerous. flooding is the leading killer in any kind of hurricanes. this is no ordinary hurricane. this one is a big event. we'll be talking about it throughout the morning. brooke? >> appreciate it. bonnie mentioned north carolina. let's go straight to the coastal area. outer banks, kill devil hills. george howl is standing by for us in an area already very much so apparently getting hit by this hurricane. and george, as i wait to see your picture, i -- here you are, is the rain coming down? >> reporter: yeah, brooke. the rain definitely coming in. it's that sideways rain. combined with sand, helping to -- a good indication that the storm is getting much closer to us. we're in an area, the northwestern quadrant of the storm. that is where you see the storm bringing in bands of heavy rain. these bands of winds that are coming in. in fact, that band right now stretches from wilmi
neighborhood david forest remembers how long it took to get electricity restored after hurricane irene. how is it to know you're going into a period of a week or so without power? >> i think it's better than last year, we kept thinking it was going to be everyday we'd get power. >> reporter: just next door, susan crowe says she's prepared for a number of rough days. >> you can have a somehow ere but it's a cold shower. you have no hot water. of course, you have nothing to cook with. >> reporter: down the street, we bumped into utility contractor rusty maxwell who said he was too busy to stop for long. what's involved with getting the power back on here? >> well, the power company has to go evaluation all the feeders and the power sources and go from there. >> reporter: scott, this is what those utility crews are up against: giant trees on top of power lines. these trees have to be removed before power can be restored. >> pelley: we wondered if sandy would disrupt gasoline supplies. it turns out six refineries in the northeast were affected by the storm. two of them shut down and four scaled
, says cancer research is suffering under the president's policies. irene frazier joins me next. humans -- even when we cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely, other humans. which is why, at liberty mutual insurance, auto policies come with new car replacement and accident forgiveness if you qualify. see what else mes standard at libertymutual.com. liberty mutual insurance. responsibility. what's your policy? then don't miss sleep train's wbest rest event.st ever? you'll find sleep train's very best mattresses at the guaranteed lowest price. plus, pay no interest for 3 years on beautyrest black, stearns & foster, serta icomfort, even tempur-pedic. and rest even better with sleep train's risk-free 100-day money back guarantee. get your best rest ever from sleep train. superior service, best selection, lowest price, guaranteed. ♪ sleep train ♪ your ticket to a better night's sleep ♪ (applause) >> my next guest has been living with breast cancer for 11 years and is undergoing chemotherapy for the 6th time and also the founder of the maureen fraser foundati
in new york harbor right now, a half a foot higher than hurricane irene. when the high tide starts to flood in late this afternoon, early this evening, we'll see record-breaking surge hikes. >> does that mean water goes in the subway? >> probably. >> probably. >> i don't know what kind of sandbagging efforts that they're going to be having in place. i mean, since irene, i know they've taken some steps to see if they can get some sort of better protection from subway entrances, but the official forecast is calling for a 10 hfgs to 12-foot storm tide and it only needs to be 10.5 feet to flood the subway. >> jeff, we've seen the pictures. we keep hearing the adjectives colossal, gigantic, to describe it. almost in november, cold in the north. how does a storm like this size form? >> well, it started in the caribbean, which it's always warm enough year around to make hurricanes form. and once it got north of the caribbean it found itself right over the gulf stream, at least over the past day or so, and it was in a very unique spot, right over an axis of the warm gulf stream waters that
's see. katrina -- or irene last year this area also flooded. but not nearly as bad as this. the clean up, it's pretty much drained within a day or so. and lost no electricity last year. this one we were -- you know, we don't know the epa. >> reporter: dan, thanks very much. good luck to you. wolf, there's one resident, one business owner here determine today recover. others here have an amazing sense of community spirit. these are all community volunteers doing all this work largely responsible for the clearing of the streets. as i mentioned, just a couple hours ago this water was up to my knees, up to the knees of these volunteers who waded out here in some very, very unhealthy and almost dangerous water because it has so much sewage and chemicals and garbage in it. >> brian, we'll get back to you in hoboken, new jersey. let's head back to manhattan. we've re-established our contact with dr. sanjay gupta. he's at bellevue hospital, sanjay, 700 patients now need to be evacuated because they've lost power, emergency generators at bellevue hospital? >> yeah. i think that's the best way of
this was an unprecedented event. we weathered hurricane irene 14 or 15 months ago with the same emergency preparations and it didn't come close to endangering the hospital. this hospital sits 20 feet above sea level, we're actually 15 feet higher than nyu hospital next door because the terrain rises slightly here, so it was obviously not anticipated that we would get a storm surge of this magnitude, the national hurricane center was predicting even at its highest 11-foot storm surge, so clearly here out of the east river, just because of the way the waters were being pushed and the level of the wind speeds, we wound up getting a lot of water here. we've never seen anything like this at bellevue hospital. >> thank you very much. we appreciate your taking the time tonight. >>> the monumental task of removing debris and getting the lights turned back on is under way on long island, new york. complicating matter this is evening, roadways are still blocked by floodwaters and preventing about 5,000 utility workers from even starting to restore power to parts of that island. republican congressman peter king
. we look at the video from where irene hit this area last year. you can see that the sand mounds and the seawalls that are intended to be the front line of defense for a storm, they were no match for the heavy rains and winds. water just poured right in. as a result, there was massive flooding, mandatory evacuations. and people in this area, once again, bracing, preparing themselves for the worst. sam? >> thank you, linsey. thank you, ginger. if you've seen the spaghetti models, they're turning this thing towards the coastline. a lot of terms are out there. atmospheric bomb. superstorm. at the same time, joking terms like frankenstorm are used. we turn to one of my good friends, expert senior meteorologist bernie rayno from accuweather. when you hear the terms, how much of it is hype on this storm? and how much is very real? >> when you've been in this field as long as you and i have been, sam, you look for a way out when you see a storm that's projected to be this strong. but unfortunately, i don't believe there is a way out. this is not being overhyped. i would use the terms de
of practice with stuff like this, whether it's irene a week ago, isaac, months ago and we're mobilizing blood, making sure the blood supply needs to be in the key areas of the country. >> rick: the last minute preparations, there isn't a lot of time left. any last minute thing you can suggest to people that they do? >> the most important thing right now in the last minute if there's little time to get out and make sure you've got the food and water you need in terms of your kit, is to have a battery operated radio, something that can give you the ability to listen to any evacuation orders or any emergency notices that may be going out. >> rick: all right, charles one last thing-- >> mention that the red cross has-- >> that's exactly where i was going to lead you i saw the phone in your hand and talk about an app? >> i am going to talk about a hurricane app. the red cross has a hurricane app that's available for apple and android, folks can download it, it's got a tremendous "i'm safe" feature that allows people with a one push of a button let friends and family know they're safe and an import
in that state. that is twice the number that were without power after hurricane irene. so a serious situation in the state of new jersey. savannah. >> all right. >>> from new jersey to connecticut, the governor there is calling the storm the worst water event in his state's history. thousands of homeowners trapped by coastal flooding. nbc's katie in connecticut this morning. katie, good morning to you. >> reporter: certainly one of the worst water events in history. now it's going to go down as one of the worse power events. take a look at what's going on here in stonington. this tree is about 80 feet tall. i'm about 5'2", 5'3". ripped out from its roots about 5:00 last night, and thrown on to, luckily, the powerlines here, which are basically cradling this tree right now. this house was saved by those power lineses. you are seeing this seen up and down connecticut as we speak. trees that are down, taking down power lines, and damaging a number of houses. that's what is causing a lot of the outages. there was massive flooding as well last night. high tide here in stonington was around 9:30 la
? >> okay. last time irene, right now, 7 billion initial estimate, totally wrong. it ultimately was 15 billion. there's about 20 billion that came into the economy from federal payment and from insurance. katrina, $100 billion, again, took a long time to rebuild what. i would say is the initial impact is very, very bad, but when the federal government gets involved, waves its wand, and when the insurers pay, you tend to have a very quick rebound that can actually help, if it's huge enough, the gross domestic product of the united states. >> i want toé@ focus in on tha not to be intencenssensitive to people are dealing with, but there are serb sectors of the economy that will benefit. i would assume the construction industry, to start with one. >> yes. hurricane andrew in 1992, the construction industry boomed. the lumber industry boomed. glass. a lot of companies simply had to send everything down to florida, and that raised the praise across the board throughout the united states. highly unusual. that was pretty much the only time that i've seen the gross national product really jum
, would be more dangerous than even irene from last year. it turned out to be a huge flood problem for virginia, vermont and new jersey. i know it's late in the season, but the water is still warm enough to make this storm generate. it went -- i was watch it last night in bed on my -- i was tweeting from 8:00 until 12:00, and this thing went from an 80-mile-per-hour storm to about a 115 as it left jamaica and slammed into cuba, and that was only in five hours. there's a lot of potential. >> is it true that a late storm as well could be a lot deadlier, a lot more dangerous late in the season? >> i would say an earlier storm, october 10th, that peak day with the waters the warmest would be the most concerning, but i think people probably take it less serious. oh, come on, it's november. it can't happen. there's not going to be anything bad. if you let your guard down and think that it's out of season, you're wrong. look at the waves there. is that miami? somewhere. look at that. the way it's crashing on. that's why you can't even be on the sea wall. you need to be behind it and in th
time. >> last year, with hurricane irene, i stocked my refrigerator. but that was not the smartest thing because our food went bad. so, we have a lot of crackers and cereal. and peanut butter crackers. >> reporter: many residents stocked up on bottled water. if you didn't have time, you can make tap water drinkable. for every gallon you need, add one-eighth of a teaspoon of house hold bleach to purify it. but let it stand for 30 minutes before consuming. >> that was fun! >> reporter: another great tip for parents with small kids, take advantage of the daylight. >> run them around during the day. then off to bed early. >> reporter: there's no video games. there's no computer. how is that for you? >> partly, i think it's awesome because i love to read. >> reporter: you need a flashlight and a good book? >> yes. >> reporter: that's great advice. and what about those of us who can't seem to live without our e-mails? you can power up mobile devices in the car. just make sure garage doors stay open. and cherish that charge by dimming the screen and turning off the wi-fi. need the web? ta
million more than we had in irene. >> wow. >> so it is -- it is a completely devastating storm from that perspective. and i think what we're going to find, unfortunately, when we get to the jersey shore today is just total devastation. >> yeah. >> and that's the real concern. because not only is it people's homes and private property, but also you have the tourism industry in new jersey which is one of our biggest industries. we're going to have to work hard to make sure we're ready for next summer at the jersey shore. >> governor chris christie, our prayers are with the state of new jersey this morning. thank you very much. >> thank you, governor, good luck. >> mika, joe, mike, willie, thank you all you guys, appreciate it. >>> coming up in minutes, author of the best-selling book "the perfect storm" and "war," we'll be right back. ♪ ♪ [ multiple sounds making melodic tune ] ♪ [ male announcer ] at northrop grumman, every innovation, every solution, comes together for a single purpose -- to make the world a safer place. that's the value of performance. northrop grumman. on ga
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)